"Growth is painful. Change is painful.But nothing is as painful as staying stuck somewhere you don’t belong."

Mandy Hale (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via crissle)

thechanelmuse:

"Create Your Own Success" by Lauren Roberts from FJorde magazine, Issue 22 (2014).

thechanelmuse:

"I just hope that the husbands don’t mistake me as one of the dark."

Remember that time that white lady traveled to Namibia, wanting to be dressed as a traditional Himba women, and they all laughed at her ol dumb ass? “The women’s howls of laughter are still ringing in my ears.” Pure comedy lmao. 

"

WHY YOU SHOULD DRINK A SHITLOAD OF WATER DAILY

Your brain is your biggest liquid asset. It is composed of more than 85 percent water. Little wonder then that if you are dehydrated, your thinking ability drops dramatically, as does the performance of your whole body.

● Water is 2nd only to oxygen in survival. A body can live for minutes without oxygen, for a few days without water, and several weeks without food.

● The human body is 60% water, blood is 90% water, muscles are 75% water, and bone is 25% water. Water is one of the main structures of the body. Drain your body of water you’ll be left with a few pounds of chemicals that are worth about $5 you guys!

●Your brain is 1/50 of your total body weight, but it receives 20% of the blood circulation, so 1/5 of your body’s water requirements come from your brain.

●Water balances and regulates almost every other system in the body — temperature regulation, digestion, and waste excretion. You cannot eliminate toxins from your body with insufficient water.

●Most headaches and feelings of fatigue are caused by dehydration.

●You lose about 10 cups of fluid each day in sweat, urine, and bowel movements. Even the air you exhale contains vital water vapor.

●If you wait until you are thirsty to drink, you are already dehydrated. Unlike hunger, thirst is a bad sign.

●Drinks that contain caffeine (colas and coffee) are diuretics, which means they lessen the body’s ability to absorb and retain water — they rob the body of water.

●It is the most time efficient way of improving your mood and overall performance. It takes seconds to drink a glass of water, but the benefits last for hours.

●Combined with a healthy lifestyle, drinking water increases weight loss.

"

(via sabersecrets)

(Source: bysaber, via thechanelmuse)

"The timing in which people enter your life is very important."

johnentwlstle:

it literally stresses me out how much good music there is that i still haven’t listened to

(Source: johnentwlstle, via heroineheroine)

"

Yesterday, I cried,
for all the days that I was too busy,
or too tired,
or too mad to cry.

I cried for all the days, and all the ways,
and all the times I had dishonored,
disrespected, and
disconnected my Self from myself,
only to have it reflected back to me
in the ways others did to me
the same things I had already done to myself.

I cried for all the things I had given,
only to have them stolen;
for all the things I had asked for that
had yet to show up;
for all the things I had accomplished,
only to give them away,
to people in circumstances,
which left me feeling empty,
and battered and plain old used.

I cried because there really does
come a time when the only thing left
for you to do is cry.

"

Iyanla Vanzant
Yesterday I Cried (via angelaflansbury)

(via lionesssoul)

"Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water can wear away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does."

Margaret Atwood, The Penelopiad  (via jarelion)

(Source: mllefantinejavert, via jarelion)

Do yourself a favor. Learn to code. Here's how.

boomeyer:

I’ve said this to my non-techie friends countless times. It’s no secret that being able to code makes you a better job applicant, and a better entrepreneur. Hell, one techie taught a homeless man to code and now that man is making his first mobile application.

Learning to code elevates your professional life, and makes you more knowledgeable about the massive changes taking place in the technology sector that are poised to have an immense influence on human life.

(note: yes I realize that 3/5 of those links were Google projects)

But most folks are intimidated by coding. And it does seem intimidating at first. But peel away the obscurity and the difficulty, and you start to learn that coding, at least at its basic level, is a very manageable, learnable skill.

There are a lot of resources out there to teach you. I’ve found a couple to be particularly successful. Here’s my list of resources for learning to code, sorted by difficulty:

Novice

Never written a line of code before? No worries. Just visit one of these fine resources and follow their high-level tutorials. You won’t get into the nitty-gritty, but don’t worry about it for now:

Dash - by General Assembly

CodeAcademy

w3 Tutorials (start at HTML on the left sidebar and work your way down)


Intermediate

Now that you’ve gone through a handful of basic tutorials, it’s time to learn the fundamentals of actual, real-life coding problems. I’ve found these resources to be solid:

Khan Academy

CodeAcademy - Ruby, Python, PHP

Difficult

If you’re here, you’re capable of building things. You know the primitives. You know the logic control statements. You’re ready to start making real stuff take shape. Here are some different types of resources to turn you from someone who knows how to code, into a full-fledged programmer.

Programming problems

Sometimes, the challenges in programming aren’t how to make a language do a task, but just how to do the task in general. Like how to find an item in a very large, sorted list, without checking each element. Here are some resources for those types of problems

Talentbuddy

TopCoder

Web Applications

If you learned Python, Django is an amazing platform for creating quick-and-easy web applications. I’d highly suggest the tutorial - it’s one of the best I’ve ever used, and you have a web app up and running in less than an hour.

Django Tutorial

I’ve never used Rails, but it’s a very popular and powerful framework for creating web applications using Ruby. I’d suggest going through their guide to start getting down-and-dirty with Rails development.

Rails Guide

If you know PHP, there’s an ocean of good stuff out there for you to learn how to make a full-fledged web application. Frameworks do a lot of work for you, and provide quick and easy guides to get up and running. I’d suggest the following:

Cake PHP Book

Symfony 2 - Get Started

Yii PHP - The Comprehensive Guide

Conclusion


If there’s one point I wanted to get across, it’s that it is easier than ever to learn to code. There are resources on every corner of the internet for potential programmers, and the benefits of learning even just the basics are monumental.

If you know of any additional, great resources that aren’t listed here, please feel free to tweet them to me @boomeyer.

Best of luck!

(via thechanelmuse)

Ferguson is no longer a trending topic

sapphicnymph:

This should worry you. This fight is far from over, we can’t start strong and simply not finish

(via thechanelmuse)

I’m in a family full of sheep. It’s depressing

I wonder if Janelle Monae is still releasing that instrumental album for The ArchAndroid….

  • me: ends incredibly depressing sentence with "lmao"
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